A cross-sectional study of the knowledge, attitude, and practice of general practitioners regarding dog bite management in nothern India

Singh, Abhishek and Bhardwaj, Anu and Mithra, Prasanna P and Siddiqui, Adiba and Ahluwalia, Surendra K. (2013) A cross-sectional study of the knowledge, attitude, and practice of general practitioners regarding dog bite management in nothern India. Medical Journal of Dr. D.Y. Patil University, 6 (2). pp. 142-145. ISSN 0975-2870

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Abstract

Context: There are many myths and false beliefs associated with wound management. These include application of oils, herbs, and red chilies on wound inflicted by rabid animals, and not washing the wound properly. General practitioners (GPs) constitute a key source of medical care in study area and are approached for antirabies treatment by victims of animal bites. Aim: The aim of the present study is to assess the knowledge and practices among the general practitioners (GPs) regarding dog bite management. Settings and Design: Community-based cross-sectional study. Materials and Methods: The present study was carried out in the private and public clinics of Ambala city from January 2012 to April 2012 using a pre-tested self-administered questionnaire. The study population composed of 100 GPs comprising 45 MBBS or above degree holders (Group 1) and 55 other GPs like BAMS, RMPs, etc (Group 2). Statistical Analysis Used: Interpretation of data was done using percentages and proportions. c2-Test was used to test the statistical difference in the knowledge between the two groups. Results: Out of the total, 68% and 29% respondents in Group 1 and Group 2, respectively, correctly told that wound must be washed with soap and water for minimum period of 15 min. A total 71% and 11% respondents in Group 1 and Group 2, respectively, could correctly answer about the target groups for pre-exposure prophylaxis. A total 62% GPs did not know the highrisk groups to whom pre-exposure prophylaxis has to be given. Conclusions: There was an apparent lack of awareness among the GPs regarding appropriate animal wound management and vaccine administration. Reorientation programs and continued medical education for GPs are required to highlight the WHO guidelines regarding treatment of animal bite.

Item Type: Article
Uncontrolled Keywords: Dog bites, general practitioner, KAP study
Subjects: Medicine > KMC Mangalore > Community Medicine
Depositing User: KMCMLR User
Date Deposited: 08 Mar 2014 07:01
Last Modified: 08 Mar 2014 07:01
URI: http://eprints.manipal.edu/id/eprint/139044

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