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Weight control behaviour in young athletes participating in track events & their attitude towards supplement use based on knowledge on nutrition label & its effect on performance.

Acharya K, Swathi and Anna Kurien, Ammu and Jain, Anupriya (2016) Weight control behaviour in young athletes participating in track events & their attitude towards supplement use based on knowledge on nutrition label & its effect on performance. In: International conference on Food, Nutrition and Health (ICFNH- 2016) “Food and Health for everybody, Everywhere, 6-8th June 2016, Kilakarai, Madurai, TamilNadu. (Submitted)

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Abstract

Background: Many sports require low body weight to achieve good results for which weight control strategies are adopted. It is essential that harmful weight control behaviours are recognized at the earliest to avoid health complications. Objectives: To determine the tendency of weight control behaviour among young athletes (13- 18years) and to understand its effect on performance as well as their knowledge and attitude towards supplement use. Method: Through purposive sampling 75 track events athletes were questioned using questionnaires, physical activity recall, and EAT-26 Anthropometric measurements were assessed. Queen’s College Step Test was used to determine VO2 max and performance. Results: None of the participants needed referrals to address weight control behavior. There was a statistically significant positive correlation of EAT-26 test score with BAZ (r=0.307**, p=0.007), triceps (r=0.379**, p<0.001) and thigh skinfold measurements (r=0.430**, p<0.001). The physical activity level (PAL) values (2.273±0.06) had a negative correlation with triceps (r = -0.435**, p<0.001) and thigh skinfold measurements (r= -0.309**, p<0.001). The triceps and thigh skinfold thickness have a negative correlation with VO2 max score (r= -0.545**, p<0.001), (r= -0.655**, p<0.001), for BAZ and PAL have a positive correlation with performance (r=0.334**, p=0.05), (r=0.299*, p=0.012). EAT-26 score had a negative correlation with performance (r= -0.277*, p=0.002). 16 (21.3%) participants were currently using supplements, nutrition knowledge was found to have a positive correlation with performance (r=0.328**, p=0.006). Conclusion: Participants with higher anthropometric measurements tend to have higher EAT-26 scores. Few participants consumed supplements, but users did not have better VO2 max than non-users and those with higher EAT-26 scores did not perform as well as those who with lower scores.

Item Type: Conference or Workshop Item (Paper)
Uncontrolled Keywords: weight control, supplements, young athletes, track events, athletic performance
Subjects: Hotel Management > WGSHA Manipal
Depositing User: WGSHA EPrints Administrator
Date Deposited: 19 Sep 2016 16:04
Last Modified: 19 Sep 2016 16:04
URI: http://eprints.manipal.edu/id/eprint/146850

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