A Prospective Study of Antimicrobial Utilisation and Cost Pattern Analysis in the Treatment of Neonatal Sepsis in a Tertiary Care Hospital

Adiga, S and Lewis, Leslie and Tripathy, A (2016) A Prospective Study of Antimicrobial Utilisation and Cost Pattern Analysis in the Treatment of Neonatal Sepsis in a Tertiary Care Hospital. nternational Journal of Current Pharmaceutical Review and Research, 7 (5). pp. 291-295. ISSN 0976 822X

[img] PDF
1512 DisplayPdf.pdf - Published Version
Restricted to Registered users only

Download (410kB) | Request a copy

Abstract

Neonatal sepsis is one of the most common reasons for admission to neonatal units. The present study, a prospective observational one, was carried out to find the antimicrobial utilisation and the various costs involved in the treatment of neonatal sepsis. Data pertaining to demographic characteristics, type of sepsis, various investigations, treatment details, costs and clinical outcome were noted at baseline and discharge. 65% of the neonatal sepsis cases were seen in male infants. Bacterial infection was the cause of sepsis in 65% of all the neonates, Klebsiella pneumoniae being the most commonly implicated micro-organism. The two initial antimicrobial regimens which were commonly preferred were ampicillin with amikacin (60%) and a combination of piperacillin plus tazobactam and amikacin (40%). 74% of neonates who were diagnosed with sepsis recovered completely from their ailment. Supportive measures, including cardiac monitoring and respiratory care, had the highest mean cost component/patient of INR 9819.05 ± 8608.61. In comparison to it, supportive drug therapy, with intravenous fluids and drugs, formed the lowest cost component (INR 3918.98± 2684.06/patient) in the study group. Treatment of gram negative sepsis and late onset sepsis was comparatively more expensive. Hence early diagnosis and appropriate antibacterial therapy could prevent the monetary burden of this dreadful disease.

Item Type: Article
Subjects: Medicine > KMC Manipal > Paediatrics
Medicine > KMC Manipal > Pharmacology
Depositing User: KMC Library
Date Deposited: 23 Nov 2016 08:53
Last Modified: 23 Nov 2016 08:53
URI: http://eprints.manipal.edu/id/eprint/147589

Actions (login required)

View Item View Item