Prevalence of respiratory syncytial virus infection among children hospitalized with acute lower respiratory tract infections in southern India

Kini, Sandesh (2019) Prevalence of respiratory syncytial virus infection among children hospitalized with acute lower respiratory tract infections in southern India. World Journal of Clinical Pediatrics, 8 (2). pp. 1-10. ISSN 2219-2808

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Abstract

Back ground: Respiratory syncytial virus (RSV) is a leading cause of lower respiratory infections among children. Aim: To investigate the proportion of RSV and non-RSV respiratory viral infections among hospitalized children ≤ 5 years. Methods: Hospitalized children aged < 5 years, with a diagnosis of acute lower respiratory infections (ALRI), admitted between August 2011-August 2013, were included. Cases were defined as laboratory-confirmed RSV and non-RSV respiratory viruses by direct fluorescence assay from the nasopharyngeal wash. Results: Of 383 1-59 mo old children hospitalized with an acute lower respiratory infection, 33.9% (130/383) had evidence of viral infection, and RSV was detected in 24.5% (94/383). Co-infections with RSV and other respiratory viruses.(influenza A or B, adenovirus, para influenza 1, 2 or 3) were seen in children 5.5% (21/383). Over 90% of the RSV-positive children were under 2 years of age. RSV was detected throughout the year with peaks seen after the monsoon season. Children hospitalized with RSV infection were more likely to have been exposed to a shorter duration of breastfeeding of less than 3 mo. RSV positive children had a shorter hospital stay, although there were significant complications requiring intensive care. Use of antibiotics was high among those with RSV and non-RSV viral infections. Conclusion: Our study provides evidence of a high proportion of RSV and other virusassociated ALRI among hospitalized children in India. RSV infection was associated with fewer days of hospital stay compared to other causes of lower respiratory infections. A high level of antibiotic use was seen among all respiratory virus-associated hospitalizations. These results suggest the need for implementing routine diagnostics for respiratory pathogens in order to minimize the use of unnecessary antibiotics and plan prevention strategies among pediatric populations.

Item Type: Article
Uncontrolled Keywords: Respiratory syncytial virus; Acute lower respiratory infections; Children; Epidemiology; India; Respiratory viral infection.
Subjects: Medicine > KMC Manipal > Paediatrics
Depositing User: KMC Library
Date Deposited: 20 Mar 2019 03:45
Last Modified: 20 Mar 2019 03:45
URI: http://eprints.manipal.edu/id/eprint/153481

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