Clinical features contributing to the sit‑to‑stand transfer in people with Parkinson’s disease: a systematic review

Cunha, Charmaine Pearl Da and Rao, Pratiksha T and Karthikbabu, S (2021) Clinical features contributing to the sit‑to‑stand transfer in people with Parkinson’s disease: a systematic review. The Egyptian Journal of Neurology, Psychiatry and Neurosurgery, 57 (1). pp. 1-15. ISSN 1110-1083

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Abstract

Introduction: The aim of this systematic review is to present the existing literature on the clinical motor, and non-motor factors contributing to sit-to-stand transfer in individuals with Parkinson’s disease. Data synthesis: Five databases (PubMed, PEDro, Cochrane, SCOPUS, and Ovid) were searched for literature on the contributing factors to sit-to-stand performance in Parkinson’s disease. A quality check of these observational studies was done using the ’strengthening the reporting of observational studies in epidemiology’ (STROBE) statement and the tool of the ’National Heart, Lung, and Blood Institute’ (NHLBI). Descriptive and quantitative data were extracted and compiled, and a meta-analysis was performed to compute the standardised mean difference. Results: Thirteen studies were selected; a majority of them provided a high-to-moderate level of evidence. Ten were cross-sectional, while the other three were case–control studies. Collectively, individuals with Parkinson’s disease had a prolonged transfer time than those of age-matched healthy peers, particularly from peak horizontal velocity phase to seat-off phase, implying bradykinesia. A reduction in peak and rate to peak joint torques was also related to the decreased pace and stability of the sit-to-stand movement in individuals with Parkinson’s disease. Additionally, they demonstrated exaggerated trunk flexion as a postural stabilisation strategy, allowing them to maintain and manoeuvre the relative positions of their centre of mass through the transitional phase of the transfer. Conclusion: As per the existing literature, an alteration in strength, overall body bradykinesia, balance, posture, as well as cognition may result in an impaired sit-to-stand transfer in individuals with Parkinson’s disease.

Item Type: Article
Uncontrolled Keywords: Cognition; joint torque; Parkinson’s disease; Sit-to-stand, speed; strength.
Subjects: Allied Health > MCOAHS Manipal > Physiotherapy
Depositing User: KMC Library
Date Deposited: 25 Mar 2022 06:21
Last Modified: 25 Mar 2022 06:21
URI: http://eprints.manipal.edu/id/eprint/158437

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